Physics Department Course Descriptions

ENGINEERING COURSES

ENGR201   Engineering Graphics and Design                                                        3 sem. hrs.

This course familiarizes the engineering student with manual graphics, technical drawing techniques, and principles, and an introduction to computer graphics.  The course considers topics in descriptive geometry, pictorial representations, drafting conventions, and computer aided design (CAD) and drafting.

 

ENGR303   Engineering Statics                                                                                  3 sem. hrs.

This is a first course in engineering vector mechanics dealing with the statics of rigid bodies and an introduction to the analysis of deformable solids.  Topics include equilibrium of force systems, analysis of frames and structures, friction, centroids, moments of inertia, and distributed forces in beams.  This course is sometimes offered via ITV.  Prerequisite:  PHYS320.

 

ENGR304   Engineering Dynamics                                                                             3 sem. hrs.

This is a course in engineering vector mechanics that deals with the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies.  Topics include the kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies.  Engineering examples are used throughout the course.  This course is sometimes offered via ITV.  Prerequisite: ENGR 303.

 

ENGR490   Independent Study: Engineering                                                        1-6 sem. hrs.

Students solve problems and earn credit for work performed independently outside the classroom requirement of any specific course in the curriculum.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

 


ASTRONOMY COURSES

PHYS271   Frontiers in Astronomy                                                                            3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for non-science majors.  Each part of this course is concerned with a different part of the new revolution in astronomy showing how much there is that is fresh and young in the oldest science.  Major topics are: stellar evolution-life histories of stars, galaxies and the universe-cosmology, and the solar system-emphasizing knowledge gained via the space program.  This course is approved for General Education-Core 7.

 

PHYS371   The Solar System                                                                                     3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for all curricula.  An in-depth study of the solar system and its component parts; the sun, the moon, the planets, the interplanetary medium, and aspects of space science, will be the main contents of the course.  Prerequisite:  PHYS271 or consent of instructor.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3

 

PHYS471   Relativity, Black Holes, and Cosmology                                              3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for all curricula.  The topics covered are divided into four parts: Special Relativity, Black Holes, Galaxies and Quasars, and Cosmology.  The course will emphasize some of the central apparent paradoxes of relativity and how their descriptive understanding applies to phenomena and topics such as black holes and cosmology.  Prerequisite:  PHYS271 or permission of the instructor.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS472   The Sun                                                                                                       3 sem. hrs.

This course is designed for all curricula.  It is an in-depth study with observational and computational laboratory of the sun and the solar atmosphere.  The photosphere, chromosphere, corona and solar spectrum will be the main topics covered.  Solar-terrestrial relationships will be dealt with in each of the topics indicated above.  Prerequisites:  PHYS271 or equivalent and PHYS201 or equivalent.    This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.


PHYSICS COURSES

PHYS101   Physical Science                                                                                      3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the classical concepts of physics with an emphasis on the understanding of their application to common phenomena encountered in today’s world. This course meets four hours per week including a two hour laboratory.  This course is approved for General Education-Core 7.

 

PHYS150   Physics Orientation                                                                                  3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the students of physics, engineering, and related areas to the processes involved in problem solving.  This course is the prerequisite for the introductory calculus based sequence in physics, PHYS320-321.  Students do computational work using calculators and computers.

 

PHYS181   Principles of Physics                                                                               3 sem. hrs.

This course is a one semester course that introduces the basic principles of physics with special emphasis on applications to biological systems, especially appropriate for students in health related fields.

 

PHYS201   Physics I                                                                                                      4 sem. hrs.

This is an introductory course for the non-physics science major.  The basic principles of physics are emphasized and selected applications are discussed.  Topics covered include mechanics, theory of gases, thermodynamics and sound.  The student should have general knowledge of elementary algebra and basic trigonometry.  A lab is included.  This course is approved for General Education-Core 7.

 

PHYS202   Physics II                                                                                                     4 sem. hrs.

The second semester of the introductory physics course for non-physics science majors.  Topics covered include electricity and magnetism, light, atomic and nuclear structure.  A lab is included.  Prerequisite:  PHYS201.  This course is approved for General Education – Distribution 3.

 

PHYS301   The Nature of Sound                                                                                3 sem. hrs.

This is a basic laboratory course in the science of sound with applications to hearing and music.  Topics include vibration, the perception of sound in a room, and the sources of sound.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS302   The Nature of Light and Color                                                                3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introductory study of the characteristics and properties of light and color.  Principles are developed which have broad relationships to everyday phenomena such as the color of the sky, the mixing of colored lights and pigments, the use of corrective lenses for vision defects; laser and holography, and fluorescent dyes and detergents.  This course is designed for a broad spectrum of students with little or no background in science but with a strong interest in light and color.  Laboratory included.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS303   The Nature of Nuclear Energy                                                                3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the basic principles underlying the structure and behavior of atoms and nuclei, and how these principles lead to the development of modern nuclear technology and its impact on society.  Topics discussed will include properties and detection of radiation, uses of radiation in industry and medicine, radioactive dating, power sources and hazards, nuclear power (fission, fusion, and breeders) and its environmental impact.  A laboratory is included.  There are no prerequisites.  Not for BA physics majors.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS305   Classical Physics Laboratory 1                                                            2 sem. hrs.

A laboratory course consisting of intermediate and advanced laboratory experiments in classical physics.  The experiments will include the analysis of experimental data and their relationship to the appropriate fundamental theory.  The course will cover all areas of classical physics such as mechanics, electricity and magnetism, heat and thermodynamics, and optics.  Pre:  PHYS321 and PHYS 323.  4 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS311   Technical Electronics I                                                                            4 sem. hrs.

This course develops the fundamental concepts of DC and AC circuits including magnetic effects. Solid state devices and their uses are introduced.  Practical circuits and the use of measuring devices are stressed in exercises.  3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS312   Technical Electronics II                                                                           4 sem. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS 311.  Active electronic device circuits are stressed.  Examples include amplifiers, power supplies, oscillators, and operational amplifiers. Pre-requisite:  PHYS 323 or PHYS 202 or permission of instructor.  3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS313   Digital Electronics                                                                                     3 sem. hrs.

This course develops the principles of digital logic and arithmetic, and the electronic implementation of these principles.  Combinational and sequential logic techniques such as Boolean algebra and Karnaugh mapping are introduced.  Discrete digital gates as well as MSI circuits are used in circuit design.  2 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory per week.  This course is approved for General Education-Elective. 

 

PHYS320   University Physics I                                                                                  4 sem. hrs.

The courses PHYS203 and PHYS204 form a two semester sequence in calculus based physics which is traditionally required of all students majoring in physics, engineering, and related sciences.  The sequence gives students the fundamental concepts needed in later physics, engineering, and related science courses.  PHYS203 is an analytical study of classical mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics.  Prerequisites:  PHYS150 or permission and concurrent enrollment in MATH211.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS321   University Physics II                                                                                 4 sem. hrs.

This course, a continuation of PHYS203, examines the fundamental observational data of electricity and magnetism and their theoretical interpretation. It includes Maxwell’s equations, and electromagnetic waves and radiation, with emphasis on optics. Prerequisite:  PHYS320 and concurrent enrollment in MATH212, or permission of instructor.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS322   Physical Measurements Lab I                                                                 1 sem. hr.

This laboratory course, designed for physics, engineering and science majors, studies methods and techniques of experimental research through selected physics experiments.  Student use computer interfaces for data collection, computation, and the various form of analysis, and use microcomputers and software and the university’s mainframe computer to analyze, graphically display, and discuss experimental results.  Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHYS320, or permission of instructor.  3 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS323    Physical Measurements Lab II                                                               1 sem. hr.

This course continues Physical Measurements Lab I, PHYS322.  Prerequisites: PHYS322 and concurrent enrollment in PHYS321, or permission.  3 hours laboratory per week.

 

 PHYS325   Introduction to Modern Physics                                                           3 sem. hrs.

This course surveys, at the intermediate level, the origin, development, and present status of the important concepts of modern physics.  The course presents the theoretical development of the concepts with their classical historical features to give the student a perspective on the growth and present trends in physics.  Prerequisite:  PHYS321 or by permission of the instructor.  This course is approved for General Education-Distribution 3.

 

PHYS404 Physics  Laboratory Instructional Techniques                                   2 sem. hrs.

A study of laboratory procedures and techniques used in secondary schools. Equipment, safety procedures, demonstrations, and  tactics of innovation are discussed and investigated, so the student can develop competencies in the efficient utilization of the laboratory.  Prerequisites:  12 semester hours of physics, or by permission of instructor.

 

PHYS405   Modern Physics Laboratory 1                                                               2 sem. hrs.

A laboratory course consisting of intermediate and advanced laboratory experiments in modern physics.  The experiments will include the analysis of experimental data and their relationship to the appropriate fundamental theory, and will cover all areas of modern physics such as atomic, nuclear, and solid state physics.  Pre or co-requisite:  PHYS325.  4 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS406   Modern Physics Laboratory 2                                                               2 sem. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS405, Modern Physics Laboratory 1.  4 hours laboratory per week.

 

PHYS410   Optics                                                                                                          3 sem. hrs.

This course is an intermediate study of geometrical and physical optics.  Topics in geometrical optics will include the nature of light, reflection, refraction, dispersion, thick lenses, aberrations, and the design of optical systems.  Topics in physical optics will include wave theory of light, diffraction, interference, and polarization.  Pre or Co-requisite:  PHYS321, or by permission of instructor.

 

PHYS420   Mechanics 1                                                                                               3 sem. hrs.

A study of classical mechanics on an intermediate level.  Topics covered include Lagrange’s equations, the central force problem, the dynamics of a system of particles, the motion of rigid bodies, Hamilton’s equations, and the dynamics of oscillating systems.  Pre or Co-requisite: PHYS325 and MATH 311 or permission of instructorCo-requisite:  MATH 317

 

PHYS421   Mechanics 2                                                                                               3 sem. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS420,  Mechanics 1.

 

PHYS430   Electricity and Magnetism 1                                                                   3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the mathematical theories of electricity and magnetism at an intermediate level.  The course develops Maxwell’s equations and uses them extensively.  Pre or Co-requisite:  PHYS 325 and concurrent enrollment in MATH 317, or by permission of instructor.

 

PHYS431   Electricity and Magnetism 2                                                                   3 sem. hrs.

A continuation of PHYS430, Electricity and Magnetism 1.

 

PHYS441   Thermal Physics                                                                                       3 sem. hrs.

This course studies at the intermediate level the physical phenomena that depend on temperature.  Topics include the three laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamic potentials, equations of state, and various applications to simple and multi-component systems.  Prerequisite: PHYS 325, MATH 311, or by permission of instructor.

 

PHYS449   Mathematical Methods in Physics                                                       3 sem. hrs.

This course studies the application of various mathematical techniques to advanced problems in physics.  Topics may include, but are not limited to, functions of a complex variable, the calculus of residues, integral transforms, and the special functions of mathematical physics.  Prerequisites:  PHYS321 and PHYS317, or by permission of instructor.

 

PHYS453   Quantum Physics                                                                                     3 sem. hrs.

This course is an introduction to the basic postulates of non-relativistic quantum mechanics.  The Schroedinger Equation and its physical interpretation will be investigated.  The representation of physical quantities by mathematical operators will be introduced and applied to a limited number of exactly solvable problems.  Approximation methods will be developed for dealing with time independent problems.  Prerequisites:  PHYS325 and MATH317.

 

PHYS490-495   Independent Study in Physics                                                   2-5 sem. hrs.

The Independent Study program aims to serve those students whose scholarly bent seems most clearly adapted to independent work.  Students are permitted to resolve problems and to earn credit for work performed outside the classroom requirement of any specific course in their curriculum.

 

PHYS496-499   Internship in Physics                                                                   2-5 sem. hrs. 


MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY COURSES

MFGT100 Manufacturing Process                                                                            4 sem. hrs.

This course develops a working knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of basic machining operations.  Students will learn the theory of metal-working.  Skills are developed and safe practices learned through laboratory work.  Laboratory projects are of increasing difficulty as the student’s skills develop.   2 hour lecture and 3 hours lab per week.

 

MFGT105 Engineering Materials                                                                                3 sem. hrs.

This course develops a working knowledge of the materials used in industry, their properties, and the factors involved in selection for specific applications.  It emphasizes those materials most often encountered in designing and using industrial tooling and equipment.

 

MFGT201 Introduction to Quality Control                                                                 3 sem. hrs.

Basic statistical quality control principles are presented with tools available for planning, evaluation, reporting, and control of quality in manufacturing, with emphasis on quality and performance improvement  in order to reduce costs of manufacturing.  The course presents basic statistical control and probability concepts, distributions, terminology, sampling plans, control charts and their use.  To enroll, students must have skill in algebra or permission of the instructor.

 

MFGT215 Machine Design                                                                                           3 sem. hrs.

This course develops a basic knowledge of the principles involved in the layout and design of industrial machinery with particular emphasis on the selection, sizing, and design of machine components.  The course consists of lectures and class exercises in component selection and sizing.  To enroll, students must have skill in algebra or permission of the instructor.

 

MFGT225 Statics and Strengths of Materials                                                        3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces statics and strengths of materials concepts and develops computational skills.  To enroll, students must have skill in algebra and trigonometry, or permission of the instructor.

 

MFGT260 Jigs and Fixtures Design                                                                          3 sem. hrs.

This course builds a basic knowledge of gauging and work-holding devices used in metalworking manufacturing.  Projects include designing several complete tools in order to develop beginning competency.

 

MFGT296 Internship in Manufacturing Eng. Tech.                                           3-12 sem. hrs.

This internship gives students experience in the manufacturing environment.  The nature of the experience and the time spent determine the amount of credit earned.

 

MFGT302 Computer Aided Drafting I                                                                        4 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student to the various CAD systems used in industry and develops operational skills with microcomputer based CAD software.  It covers methods of geometric construction, dimensioning, layering, storage, plotting, revision, and related topics.  Prerequisite:  ENGR 201.  3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week.

 

MFGT306 Strengths of Materials Laboratory                                                  3 sem. hrs.

This course will introduce the student to the principles of strength, stiffness, and stability of materials as they relate to the design of components used in daily life.  Course topics include design properties, axial deformation, thermal stresses, torsional shear stresses, torsional deformation, and shearing forces in materials.  1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab.  Prerequisite:  MFGT 105

 

MFGT309 Mold Design                                                                                                  3 sem. hrs.

This course develops a basic understanding of molds for compression and transfer molding of thermosetting plastics and for injection molding of thermoplastics.  Projects include the design of several complete molds in order to build a beginning level of competency.  Prerequisite: ENGR 201 or permission of instructor.

 

MFGT310 Advanced Mold Design                                                                              3 sem. hrs.

This course is a continuation of MFGT210, Mold Design 1, building on the concepts learned therein and developing more marketable skill.  It emphasizes materials selection, tolerancing for proper fits, and designing of more complex mold details such as stripper plates, core slides, and actuating devices.  Projects include designing several injection molds of increasing complexity.  Prerequisite:  MFGT309.

 

MFGT311 Rapid Prototyping                                                                                       3 sem. Hrs.

This course will introduce the student to rapid prototyping manufacturing techniques.  Course topics include parametric part modeling, reverse engineering concepts, prototyping design restrictions, stereo-lithography rapid prototyping, and 3D printing processes. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisites: MFGT 105, ENGR201, MFGT302.

 

MFGT315   Operational Planning in Manufacturing                                               3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the student to manufacturing operations styles and the environments and constraints which affect operations.  Course topics include system development cycles, shop planning fundamentals, job cost estimating and budgeting, risk management, evaluations, reporting and termination in manufacturing projects.  Prerequisite:  CSCI 104 or higher.

 

MFGT320 Cost Estimating                                                                                           3 sem. hrs.

This course develops an understanding of the factors which contribute to manufacturing cost in modern industry and builds practical ability to estimate material requirements and labor content of manufacturing operations in order to determine product pricing.  Requires high school algebra or permission of the instructor.

 

MFGT365 Die Design                                                                                                     3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces punch press dies for manufacturing of parts from sheet metal in the form of strip or coil.  The students learn how dies function, the types of parts which may be manufactured using dies, how to calculate press tonnage and stripping forces, and how to choose and size components.  Design projects reinforce the learning.  Prerequisite:  ENGR 201.

 

MFGT370 Motion and Time Study                                                                              3 sem. hrs.

This course gives an overview of the methods and tools used in motion study, which involves the design and improvement of manufacturing methods, and those used in time study, which concerns measuring the human effort in terms of manufacturing time. Extensive classroom exercises will reinforce concepts and will develop skill.

 

 

MFGT375 Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)                                                  3 sem. hrs.

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of programming and operating digitally controlled machine tools.  2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week. Prerequisite: MFGT 100 or permission of the instructor.

 

MFGT404 Systems Control                                                                                         3 sem. hrs.

This course focuses on the various techniques used for signal acquisition and control.  Subjects treated include transducers, signal conditioning, control principles, and control loop characteristics.  The course includes a laboratory.   Contract hours per week:  2 hrs lecture, 2 hours lab.  Prerequisite:  a course in electronics and MATH 107 (or equivalent) or permission of instructor.

 

MFGT410 Fluid Power                                                                                                   3 sem. hrs.

This course develops knowledge of hydraulics and pneumatics as used for power and control of industrial equipment.  The student, after completion of the course, will be able to design control circuits and to size and select components for a wide range of applications.

 

MFGT420 Material Handling and Facility Planning                                                3 sem. Hrs.

The course will introduce the student to integrated material handling systems and systematic approach to facilities planning.  Course topics include automatic identification, common material handling equipment used in manufacturing, and simulation of material flows.  Prerequisites: MFGT102, MFGT105, CSCI104 or higher.

 

MFGT435 Heat Transfer and Applied Thermodynamics                                      3 sem. hrs.

This course consists of a comprehensive treatment of classical heat transfer and thermodynamics for engineering technologists.  Topics include the application of equations of state, the first and second laws of thermodynamics, engine and refrigeration cycles, and the modes of heat transfer.  Prerequisites:  MATH 211, PHYS 201 and CHEM 120

 

MFGT490 Independent Study: Man. Eng. Tech.                                                   1-6 sem. hrs.

Students solve problems and earn credit for work performed independently outside the classroom requirement of any specific course in the curriculum.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.